Listings for Ortho Flex

15.5" Orthoflex Team Pen / Barrel Saddle
15.5" Orthoflex Team Pen / Barrel Saddle
   $1,600.00
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Orthoflex trail saddle, excellent shape!
Orthoflex trail saddle, excellent shape!
   $1,700.00
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Ortho Flex Western Saddle
Ortho Flex Western Saddle
   $1,200.00
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Ortho-Flex Black Western Show Trail Saddle OrthoFlex Montana Silver 15" Seat
Ortho-Flex Black Western Show Trail Saddle OrthoFlex Montana Silver 15" Seat
   $1,600.00
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Original Len Brown Performance OrthoFlex endurance saddle 15"
Original Len Brown Performance OrthoFlex endurance saddle 15"
   $900.00
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Ortho-Flex UKCT 17" English Saddle
Ortho-Flex UKCT 17" English Saddle
   $850.00
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Related Ortho Flex information

Hit a Wall

xrmn002 said: So I've completely hit a wall. 2 years ago I bought an OTTB and had a horrible freak accident that put me in intensive care. The problem ended up being a change (and overdose) in feed that made my horse extremely HOT. Since then my horse has been in training with a fantastic trainer who has done a wonderful job with my horse and has taught me a lot about dressage. It's taken a long time for me to physically and emotionally get over my accident but we've been making steady progress. It took months of not being able to ride, then months of feeling like I was going to throw up every time I rode to finally enjoying riding again. Things were pretty much back to normal for 6 months. Then about three months ago I got on my uncharacteristically silly, fresh horse. I could feel that he was keyed up and tight in his back and tried to work through it by redirecting it at first and then stretching him down. When I went to stretch him down he uncharacteristically snatched the bit, let out a huge buck and then took off. I rode through it without an issue but the buck reinjured my back (necessitating some time off him). Now I'm petrified to get back on him again. I know I am a good rider and can handle him but after over a year of trying to get it back, I'm afraid I am finally losing my nerve for good. I just don't have the energy to force my self to ride through it anymore. I am relying heaving on my trainer right now who puts me on other horses and ensures I have positive rides on my horse to help build my confidence up. I'm learning a lot but it's making me feel SO dependent and/or like I can't handle my horse alone. I honestly don't think I can sell my horse and have come to the conclusion that this is something I just need to get past. Anyone have any ideas on getting my nerve back? Have I gone completely crazy?

sm*thywess said: Hello XRM, This might go over badly on this forum,and while it's very difficult to get specific on your particular horse without seeing him,almost all 'dressage' horses I see are both overfed and underworked,to the extent of making them dangerous. Some find themselves in the slaughter house because of this. A good many of them are simply not broke to ride and it's astounding to observe the lack of groundwork their riders are prepared to learn to help train their horses. Lungeing seems to involve 'getting the beans' out of the horse before it gets ridden. I observe folk watching their horses buck and rear and perform all sorts of other monkey business on the end of the lunge line without doing anything to stop it. Some let their horses roll around on the ground at the end of a lunge line, or lead shank and think it's cute and being kind to the horse. Most dressage horses have never been taught to actually come to an instant stop on the command of 'whoaa'. As for any thoughts of working a horse classically in-hand forget it. It either isn't taught, or is out of fashion or the rider doesn't think it's important. All four classical schools employ a great amount of ground work in the classical education of their horses. I've no idea why the rank and file don't follow their example. Good luck with your horse. Don't give up.

Mr.GM*n said: If you feel like you can stick it out(work it out mentally too) and you really can go somewhere with your current horse, then by all means you should probably stick it out. I, on the other hand, felt I could not stick it out with a horse I previously had, as he bucked me off, which not only unnerved me tremendously, but I lost all confidence in him as well. I sent him off to be worked for several months and to be sold, and my dressage trainer put me on her wonderful schoolmasters for about a year. That worked wonders for me in my confidence. Best of luck, it really all depends on how you can manage your fear. I felt like I was at an age where I really didn't want to try and stick it out anymore and after the horse's last buck with me on him, I decided it was best for me and my family to move on.

n*tg said: I agree with Mr. Gman. Only you can know if this horse may actually be the right horse for you. However, I feel sometimes a horse and rider simply aren't suited for each other. It doesn't have to mean there's anything wrong with either one - sometimes it's just not the right matchup. If this is your case, I think your horse deserves a rider who is a good match, and more importanly - as the person paying the bills and torturing yourself to try to get through this - you deserve a horse who is the right match for you. There are so many stories of riders who spend many years attempting to make themselves fit with the wrong horses (my mom was one of them - and she ended up with an injury which never fully healed and convinced her to quit riding a few years later once she HAD found the right fit), but there's no shame in saying you two personalities just aren't right together. The good news is, it sounds like you have a trainer who is understanding and trying to help you get your confidence back - and hopefully that trainer will be willing to work with you to find a horse who is a great fit for you, if you decide this horse won't be. From your post I'm sure the trainer will keep working with you to get your nerve back if this horse is the right one for you. Good luck!

*uburn said: Have you ever read "Heads Up!" by Dr. Janet Sasson Edgette? A few years ago, I was having some issues with a homebred, almost 17 hand, Appendix QH. He liked to jump, canter a few strides away, then suddenly stop and drop his head. I was riding in a saddle which was too small for me (my knees were slightly in front of the knee rolls). When I schooled over fences, out of the blue, he would do his stop and drop the head routine. I went over his neck and hit the dirt a few times. My old body did not bounce like it did when I was younger. I began having confidence issues, too. Reading "Heads Up!" helped me get back my confidence. (Getting a saddle big enough for my long thighs and big butt did not hurt, either! :winkgrin:) Working on other horses can help to build your strength and improve your balance, but will not fix the mental issues that you have with your horse. This book might be able to help with those. :)

Br*oklyn Born said: I can truly feel for you because I am going through a similar process with my mare--although I haven't been through a serious accident like you have, I have gotten hurt by falls and they have seriously damaged my confidence. I'm in my mid 50s and don't bounce anymore (I splat). You have gotten some good advice here. I would just like to add that if you are determined to keep working with your horse, and have the finances, perhaps you could consult with a sports psychologist who specializes in equestrians. We have one in our area, and I know she is quite good. I don't know if there is one near you, but it's a thought. Be kind to yourself!

N*MIOMI1 said: Where I am living now, everyone and their brother has an OTTB. They are ALL in huge pastures though and have been some of the sanest horses I have ever seen. That being said, I have sold an anglo that just WASNT getting enough work from me. She liked jumping, and the work load fit her level of hotness more than what I could give. Riding should be fun, and it should be a learning experience, how is that going to happen if you are just trying to keep everything together? I love a good hot horse, but I probably wont own one that needs to be work like that again until I have the TIME to give it the long hacks in between work, and some variety. My opinion? Get something safer, and keep your body ABLE to ride much longer.

l*rilu said: Does he buck with your trainer? (Is someone riding him?) Are you sure about the saddle fit etc? I have a similar story, hurt on (off!) a horse, lost confidence, spent a few years with a schoolmaster to get skills and confidence back, when he retired, the new horse started running off.... but I just could not give up on him. Here are some of the things that worked for me. 1. Lots of ground work to build confidence in both my ability and his trust in me. 2. Longe every time before I ride. Allows me to warm him up and assess the day's attitude. Longing is work for him, not play. 3. Get on even if it means sitting there for a minute then getting off. When I started to feel nervous, I got off before it could spread to Gideon. 4. Strategies to get his attention back on me - small circle to the inside, SI , etc. Not too many 20m circles at a time, or long lines. 4. I did use a non-valerian herbal calmer (a liquid from Hilton Herbs). I have no idesa if it worked - maybe it just made me more confident in him? ALSO, there is a "tapping" sequence (EMT? something like that) I used before my ride to settle my self.... and I also gave myself a dose of rescue Remedy! Now, a year down the road, we are about to enter our first show at TL (we did Intro last year). Good luck with the journey. L

*notherRound said: Only you can decide how much more energy you want to put into this horse. To me it sounds like you aren't ready to take a deep breath and continue on with him. Doesn't mean he's bad, just means you need something diffrerent. Think about pushing on with him. How does that feel? The emotional and physical commitment to continue on with this horse. Now think about handing him over to the trainer to sell. Or trading with the trainer for one of her schoolmasters, in some way, and looking ahead to a more secure and predictable horse experience. Which feels better to you? My bet is with the second type of scenario. If so, do it. Who's to say you can't? Good luck.

D*nkey said: I can truly feel for you because I am going through a similar process with my mare--although I haven't been through a serious accident like you have, I have gotten hurt by falls and they have seriously damaged my confidence. I'm in my mid 50s and don't bounce anymore (I splat). You have gotten some good advice here. I would just like to add that if you are determined to keep working with your horse, and have the finances, perhaps you could consult with a sports psychologist who specializes in equestrians. We have one in our area, and I know she is quite good. I don't know if there is one near you, but it's a thought. Be kind to yourself! I have to agree - employ a professional to help you through this if you haven't already. Though it sounds like you have a gem of a coach, this problem really is outside the scope of a trainer's responsibilities and skill. You should be working with a trained professional to deal with your fear and anxiety. You are employing a professional to help with your horse and your riding which is great but it is only part of the problem - give yourself as much of a chance as you are giving your horse. I also totally agree that if you find a professional with horse knowledge even better. There are lots out there just start asking around. You're worth it! ETA - getting some help and guidance from a pro will often mean that you do not have to face months of feeling miserable while you wait for your courage to return. You will be back in the saddle having FUN and ENJOYING your rides much more quickly than if you suffer through on your own.

N*MIOMI1 said: Only you can decide how much more energy you want to put into this horse. To me it sounds like you aren't ready to take a deep breath and continue on with him. Doesn't mean he's bad, just means you need something diffrerent. Think about pushing on with him. How does that feel? The emotional and physical commitment to continue on with this horse. Now think about handing him over to the trainer to sell. Or trading with the trainer for one of her schoolmasters, in some way, and looking ahead to a more secure and predictable horse experience. Which feels better to you? My bet is with the second type of scenario. If so, do it. Who's to say you can't? Good luck. Yep, Remember Flicka was a fictional story for a reason :) There is no shame in being safe and not wanting to lose your ability to ride over another accident. Anything can happen with any horse, so why up the odds since your fear wont let you respond correctly?

*nsideLeg2OutsideRein said: My initial instinct would be rehome the horse and move on. If he frightens you that much, why do that to yourself (and him) ? Examine your reasons for not wanting to that thoroughly, and if you still come to the conclusion that you want to push through it, get some professional therapeutic help. Here in the SF Bay Area, I know of a program that specifically deals with riding fear issues -- I would look for that first, and if that can't be found look for a sports psychologist. I had a lot of fear after my horse put me in the ER about 5 years ago (found out later that it was a pain issue for him, not really his fault, but still). And I didn't even have any long term injuries. I started back by only getting on him with someone else around, and walking only. Then a little trot when I felt comfortable. No cantering for ages. It took me a very, very, very long time to ride him confidently again. And I didn't put any pressure on myself. I was riding other horses (lease) that I had no issues on them whatsoever. I was ok with maybe not riding my guy anymore (which was also my trainer's advice).

g*eslikestink said: Only you can decide how much more energy you want to put into this horse. To me it sounds like you aren't ready to take a deep breath and continue on with him. Doesn't mean he's bad, just means you need something diffrerent. Think about pushing on with him. How does that feel? The emotional and physical commitment to continue on with this horse. Now think about handing him over to the trainer to sell. Or trading with the trainer for one of her schoolmasters, in some way, and looking ahead to a more secure and predictable horse experience. Which feels better to you? My bet is with the second type of scenario. If so, do it. Who's to say you can't? Good luck. agree

dwbl*ver said: In all honesty this horse sounds like he is just too much for you. If your trainer does not have trouble with him, then I'd look into selling him to a very strong, confident rider like your trainer. There are people who like a challenge. If you still want to keep him, then I would absolutely start ALL over again. I would go through like he's never been broken to ride. Start with groundwork, progress to short uncomplicated rides at walk/trot. Then slowly move on from there. This horse has major holes in his training. Be sure to reward him when he's good. TBs love reward-based training. But also be very firm when he's bad so he knows the difference. I have always had super sane OTTBs. I have a seven year old now that I bought at 5 off the track who is hands down the BEST horse I've ever sat on. Jumping, dressage, trails, whatever I feel like that day he's game. Super quiet. Now, my gelding probably had a fantastic trainer at the track, which makes a huge difference. Sounds like your guy may have had some bad experiences wth a less than stellar trainer. Go back to square one.

C*lhoun said: I agree w/ NOMIOMI1, there is no shame here if you walk away. Mentally it is very, very difficult to have the same relationship with a horse after a bad accident. It is like your life before the accident and then after, each life is different. Don't let this horse ruin your love of horses and riding. Good luck!

J*ne Honda said: Hello XRM, This might go over badly on this forum,and while it's very difficult to get specific on your particular horse without seeing him,almost all 'dressage' horses I see are both overfed and underworked,to the extent of making them dangerous. Some find themselves in the slaughter house because of this. A good many of them are simply not broke to ride and it's astounding to observe the lack of groundwork their riders are prepared to learn to help train their horses. Lungeing seems to involve 'getting the beans' out of the horse before it gets ridden. I observe folk watching their horses buck and rear and perform all sorts of other monkey business on the end of the lunge line without doing anything to stop it. Some let their horses roll around on the ground at the end of a lunge line, or lead shank and think it's cute and being kind to the horse. Most dressage horses have never been taught to actually come to an instant stop on the command of 'whoaa'. As for any thoughts of working a horse classically in-hand forget it. It either isn't taught, or is out of fashion or the rider doesn't think it's important. All four classical schools employ a great amount of ground work in the classical education of their horses. I've no idea why the rank and file don't follow their example. Good luck with your horse. Don't give up. Um, man. I think NOT. The horses that end up in a slaughterhouse are from people that breed the hell out of their horses that should never been bred in the first place. The energy from a dressage horse comes from being FIT. They work hard. To the OP. I had a horrific freak sportbike accident that involved the bike flipping at 120 mph and me sliding over 200 feet on the freeway. I was in the hospital for 7 weeks with a broken back, finger, tailbone, and massive external injuries. Was I afraid to ride motorcycles again? You bet. But, I did it. Now, I ride all over creation keeping up with the boys on their big bikes. I now ride a 250 sportbike. What I'm saying is this. It takes a lot of work to get past fear. You will cry, you will feel like you are having a heart attack, you may vomit. But, your trainer has the right idea about putting you on more easy going horses. You will only be stepping backwards right now if you insisted on riding your horse. You will have to swallow some pride, and ride other horses for now until you feel more confident. Then, you can get back on your horse. What you are feeling is totally normal, and good for you for wanting to keep going. Don't give up on what you love.

k*okicat said: I think I'd send this boy off for a month of solid training with a really good trainer. Get him in the working mindset again before you get back on. Also, there's no shame in riding with your trainer at the moment. Stay safe, that's the main thing. How about having some lunge line lessons on your boy so you can focus on riding him without having to worry about staying in control?

xrmn002 said: Thanks everyone for your suggestions. I am still on the fence but I think I am going to try a little longer with my horse. Here's a little bit more info about me and my horse that may make this make more sense. I talked to my trainer and he said that he doesn't think my horse is too much for me when I am well- We just have to be really careful because my back is not strong anymore and I don't have a lot of stamina. He thinks that a calmer horse is good for me right now but that I will regret it in 6 mos. to a year if I sell him and will be bored. In the meantime I have 2-3 other horses that I can use as my primary riding horses. For now, I will only ride my horse with my trainer (mostly at a walk and trot) and after a day off or a day stuck inside, he will get on first and work with him a bit. He thinks most of it is in my head due to the accident vs. being able to ride the horse and that I need to have good experiences to gradually get over my fears. My horse is very sensitive and requires an experienced rider because of it, but he's not spooky, does not rear and has has only bucked 3-4 times since I've owned him the past two years. Plus, he's also a total doll on the ground and is a favorite with the vet and the grooms. The thing is he's young and when things go wrong, it's BIG and happens FAST. However, other horses can do much more and not phase me. Monday I put him online for sale and just couldn't stand it. I ended up taking it down after a day and am resolved to try for a few more months. If I can't get it together I agree that it's not a good thing for either of us. Keeping my fingers crossed...

H*mpton Bay said: The most important question, IMO, would be "does the horse meet me halfway". Does he TRY to do what you ask? Or is he looking for ways to get out of work? I have one of the latter. She works very hard at doing the wrong things, just to get out of doing what you want. She's getting better, but I always have to keep on top of her. Sometimes I really don't enjoy riding her because it's frustrating. If your horse is like that, then maybe it is time to move on. There is a difference in liking a challenge, and liking a sensitive horse. You can have sensitive while still being willing.